PERSONALIZATION #3: PERSONALIZED GLUCOSE RESPONSES TO DIFFERENT BREADS – While we are all 99.9% genetically identical, our metabolism of the foods we eat can be very different depending on our human genes and our Microbiome.

PERSONALIZATION #3: PERSONALIZED GLUCOSE RESPONSES TO DIFFERENT BREADS – While we are all 99.9% genetically identical, our metabolism of the foods we eat can be very different depending on our human genes and our Microbiome. You cannot change your genes, but your diet and lifestyle can affect the levels of insulin and other hormones released when you eat carbohydrates. Your Microbiome also is affected by diet and lifestyle. In an early experiment to show Personalized metabolism, researchers fed two different breads: a whole grain bread and a typical white bread for one week each in random order over a two week period. Within the same person the responses to white bread and whole grain bread were different, and the same difference was repeatable. However, the responses of different individuals to either the whole grain bread or white bread were very different. The Microbiome was stable during the entire two week test period. In all cases, the whole grain bread led to less of a rise in blood sugar. The general guideline that whole grain bread has a lower Glycemic index or GI than white bread is true for everyone since whole grain bread always led to less of a rise in blood sugar, but the effects in different individuals were personalized and different. These differences may be important in determining the risk of developing certain age-related conditions such as Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes. In my next post, I will describe an experiment in which many different individual foods combined into whole diets had individual personalized effects on blood sugar that could be predicted in advance. Stay tuned. To learn more read the e-book “Personalized Nutrition and Transformation” by Heber and Bowerman on Amazon.com for $ 5.49 and go to www.drdavidheber.com and www.herbalifenutritioninstitute.com

A post shared by Dr. David Heber (@drdavidheber) on



Categories: Nutrition

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: